Nature-Inspired Nanotubes That Assemble Themselves

When it comes to the various nanowidgets scientists are developing, nanotubes are especially intriguing. That’s because hollow tubes that have diameters of only a few billionths of a meter have the potential to be incredibly useful, from delivering cancer-fighting drugs inside cells to desalinating seawater. But building nanostructures is difficult. And creating a large quantity…

Supercomputer simulates collapse of massive stars

A supercomputer simulation of a mere 10 milliseconds in the collapse of a massive star into a neutron star proves that these catastrophic events, often called hypernovae, can generate the enormous magnetic fields needed to explode the star and fire off bursts of gamma rays visible halfway across the universe. The results of the simulation…

A quantum message across 2km

  Researchers in the US have set a new quantum record, using photons to carry messages between two electrons almost 2 km (1.2 miles) apart. This is a really big deal, because it brings us a step closer to figuring out how to send quantum entangled particles over long distances, which is what we need…

Sonic tractor beam invented

A team of researchers from the Universities of Bristol and Sussex in collaboration with Ultrahaptics have built the world’s first sonic tractor beam that can lift and move objects using sound waves. Tractor beams are mysterious rays that can grab and lift objects. The concept has been used by science-fiction writers, and programmes like Star…

Quantum technology set to hit the streets within two years

YOU’VE heard of quantum mechanics, now meet the quantum engineers. After decades of being stuck in the lab, quantum science is about to emerge as a technology that will impact your everyday life. If ambitious plans succeed, by 2020 the UK could host the world’s most powerful quantum computer, a secure quantum network spanning the…

Crucial hurdle overcome in quantum computing

The significant advance, by a team at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney appears today in the international journal Nature. “What we have is a game changer,” said team leader Andrew Dzurak, Scientia Professor and Director of the Australian National Fabrication Facility at UNSW. “We’ve demonstrated a two-qubit logic gate – the…

Scientists produce status check on quantum teleportation

Mention the word ‘teleportation’ and for many people it conjures up “Beam me up, Scottie” images of Captain James T Kirk. But in the last two decades quantum teleportation – transferring the quantum structure of an object from one place to another without physical transmission—has moved from the realms of Star Trek fantasy to tangible…

Google’s Quantum Computer Just Got a Big Upgrade

GOOGLE IS UPGRADING its quantum computer. Known as the D-Wave, Google’s machine is making the leap from 512 qubits—the fundamental building block of a quantum computer—to more than a 1000 qubits. And according to the company that built the system, this leap doesn’t require a significant increase in power, something that could augur well for…

Physicists successfully map individual atoms in 3D

Technology can evolve at such a rapid rate that many scientific discoveries are not just pushing boundaries, they’re practically barging them. Example, Physicists at UCLA have managed to 3D-map the position of individual atoms to a precision of 19 trillionths of a meter (that’s several times smaller than a hydrogen atom, for those of you…

Researchers use laser to levitate, glowing nanodiamonds in vacuum

Researchers have, for the first time, levitated individual nanodiamonds in vacuum. The research team is led by Nick Vamivakas at the University of Rochester who thinks their work will make extremely sensitive instruments for sensing tiny forces and torques possible, as well as a way to physically create larger-scale quantum systems known as macroscopic Schrödinger…

Calculations enable mesoscale design and assembly

As molecular-level electronic, photonic and biological devices grow smaller, approaching the nanometer scale, chemists, physicists and materials scientists strive to predict the magnitude of the fundamental intermolecular interactions, and whether new hierarchical combinations of these material components will assemble and function as designed. Scientists at Case Western Reserve University and collaborators at University of Massachusetts-Amherst…